Cox® Technic
a discussion place for spinal pain management with Cox® Technic

New Research - Perna Canaliculus Reduces Gastrointestinal Dysfunction

March 22, 2012 10:32 by juliecoxcid

Since the early days of his chiropractic career, Dr. James Cox has studied the nutrition of the disc right alongside all the biomechanical influences and clinical treatment approaches. Nutrition of the disc is important! Building cartilage, reducing inflammation, slowing degeneration and regenerating cartilage are positive outcomes for lower back pain patients. So he developed Discat Plus for his patients as part of the Cox Technic System for Spinal Pain Management.

Discat Plus has glucosamine sulfate plus the minerals found in the disc, but it also uses perna canaliculus as the source for the chondroitin sulfate. Perna Canaliculus is so beneficial! It is reported in the medical literature studies to improve cartilage (like knee and disc) mobility, pain and stiffness. A new report just coming out discusses perna's positive effect on gastrointestinal dysfunction (in 49% of osteoarthritis patients), too! Back and neck pain sufferers benefit as well as osteoarthritis sufferers.

Check out more information, an audio discussion about disc nutrition by Dr. Cox, and more details about the ingredients in Discat Plus to benefit the disc's cartilage alongside the  flexion distraction chiropractic spinal manipulation adjustment! 


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Calcium Taken With Meals May Actually be Protective from Developing Kidney Stones

January 19, 2012 18:54 by juliecoxcid
There is sometimes confusion about kidney stones (calcium oxalate) and taking calcium. Well, calcium can actually be protective from kidney stone development. Drs. Oz and Roizen discuss this in their column that ran on January 16, 2012. You can read it at their website as well. Calcium may actually protect you from kidney stones.

Curhan also pointed out that he found no relationship between calcium intake and kidney stone formation in his New England Journal of Medicine article.

Read more about calcium supplementation from Cox Technic Resource Center, then contact us to order some for your chiropractic nutrition practice.


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Calcium Taken With Meals May Actually be Protective from Developing Kidney Stones - Dr. Oz & Roizen

January 19, 2012 18:54 by juliecoxcid
There is sometimes confusion about kidney stones (calcium oxalate) and taking calcium. Well, calcium can actually be protective from kidney stone development. Drs. Oz and Roizen discuss this in their column that ran on January 16, 2012. You can read it at their website as well. Calcium may actually protect you from kidney stones.

Curhan also pointed out that he found no relationship between calcium intake and kidney stone formation in his New England Journal of Medicine article.

Read more about calcium supplementation from Cox Technic Resource Center, then contact us to order some for your chiropractic nutrition practice.


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Calcium Taken With Meals May Actually be Protective from Developing Kidney Stones - Dr. Oz & Roizen

January 19, 2012 18:43 by juliecoxcid

There is sometimes confusion about kidney stones (calcium oxalate) and taking calcium. Well, calcium can actually be protective from kidney stone development. Drs. Oz and Roizen discuss this in their column that ran on January 16, 2012. You can read it at their website as well. Calcium may actually protect you from kidney stones.

Curhan also pointed out that he found no relationship between calcium intake and kidney stone formation in his New England Journal of Medicine article.

Read more about calcium supplementation from Cox Technic Resource Center, then contact us to order some for your chiropractic nutrition practice.


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Calcium Taken With Meals May Actually be Protective from Developing Kidney Stones - Dr. Oz & Roizen

January 19, 2012 18:43 by juliecoxcid

There is sometimes confusion about kidney stones (calcium oxalate) and taking calcium. Well, calcium can actually be protective from kidney stone development. Drs. Oz and Roizen discuss this in their column that ran on January 16, 2012. You can read it at their website as well. Calcium may actually protect you from kidney stones. Check out more information about calcium supplementation from Cox Technic Resource Center, then contact us to order some for your chiropractic nutrition practice.


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Osteoporosis Management: Drug vs. Vitamin Therapy?

April 28, 2010 16:36 by juliecoxcid

OSTEOCLAST PREVENTION DRUGS CALLED BIPHOSPHONATES (FOSAMAX, ACTONEL, BONIVA, RECLAST) LINKED TO UNPROVOKED FRACTURE OF THE FEMUR...ALSO LINKED TO OSTEONECROSIS OF THE JAW.  

Biphosphonates act on osteoclasts to prevent bone breakdown and reabsorption. This causes disturbed osteoblast and osteoclast balance and bone becomes brittle and susceptible to fracture.  (source: Fort Wayne News Sentinel, April 26, 2010, page 1F) It is recommended, therefore, that women do the following to treat osteoporosis: 

  1. Take calcium.  Dr. Cox suggests Formula #2 which is calcium citrate (as opposed to calcium carbonates often sold in drugstores) in capsule form with hydrochloric acid for absorption, magnesium, manganese, vitamin D3 and an additional 5 000 units of vitamin D3 a day.  Click here for more information.
  2. Increase Vitamin D3 intake to 5000 units a day.
  3. Exercise regularly with walking and free weight.
  4. Minimize caffeine and alcohol intake.

Further, please consider...70% decrease in fracture using Vitamin D3 vs. placebo...

VITAMIN D-3 SUPPLEMENTATION SHOWED A 70% PROBABILITY OF BEING A BETTER TREATMENT THAN PLACEBO FOR THE PREVENTION OF NON-VERTEBRAL FRACTURES, HIP FRACTURES, AND NON-VERTEBRAL, NON-HIP FRACTURES

from Bergman, GJD; Fan, T; McFetridge, JT; Sen, SS: Efficacy of vitamin D-3 supplementation in preventing fractures in elderly women: A meta-analysis. CURRENT MEDICAL RESEARCH AND OPINION 2010; 26 (5):1193-1201 The efficacy of vitamin D-3 in preventing fractures and falls has been explored in a number of clinical trials. However, recent evidence revealed new questions about the adequate doses of vitamin D-3 supplementation and its efficacy in fracture prevention independent of calcium supplements for various types of fractures.

A meta-analysis to estimate the effectiveness of 800 IU daily vitamin D-3 supplementation for increasing bone mineral density (BMD) and preventing fractures in postmenopausal women was done on Medline and EMBASE for controlled trials comparing the effectiveness of cholecalciferol (vitamin D-3) against placebo with or without background calcium supplementation in the treatment of postmenopausal women.

Results: Eight controlled trials evaluating the effect of vitamin D-3 supplementation with or without calcium were assessed. Of 12 658 women included in a Bayesian meta-analysis, 6089 received vitamin D-3 (with or without calcium) and 6569 received placebo (with or without calcium). Compared to placebo, vitamin D3 with calcium supplementation showed beneficial effects on the incidence of non-vertebral and hip fractures, while the effects on non-vertebral-non-hip fractures were associated with more uncertainty. Vitamin D-3 supplementation showed a 70% probability of being a better treatment than placebo for the prevention of non-vertebral fractures, hip fractures, and non-vertebral, non-hip fractures. Compared to calcium supplementation, vitamin D-3 plus calcium reduced non-vertebral fractures (OR 0.68, 95% CL 0.43-1.01) and non-vertebral, non-hip fractures, but did not reduce hip fractures. Key limitations to this analysis include a small number of studies and heterogeneity in the study populations.

Conclusions: This meta-analysis supports the use of vitamin D3 of 800 IU daily to reduce the incidence of osteoporotic non-vertebral, hip, and non-vertebral-non-hip fractures in elderly women. Vitamin D-3 with calcium appears to achieve benefits above those attained with calcium supplementation alone for non-vertebral and non-vertebral-non-hip fractures.


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Osteoporosis is Preventable with Nutrition

February 26, 2010 02:23 by juliecoxcid

Osteoporosis continues to get attention in the medical and public media. New drugs are advertised to address osteoporosis. Well, Stransky and Rysava (in article: Nutrition as Prevention and Treatment of Osteoporosis. PHYSIOLOGICAL RESEARCH vol 58, no SUPPL, pgsS7-S11) present their findings from a meta analysis of 29 studies regarding calcium and vitamin D3 supplementation as

  • reducing the risk of bone fractures by 24% and
  • significantly reducing loss of bone mass.
Mind you, a meta analysis in the research world is the top level research. It considers the outcomes and results of many similar studies to draw a conclusion. These studies are highly regarded. Now, as most know but Stransky and Rysava summarize quite nicely, "osteoporosis is a systemic disease of the skeleton, characterized by reduction of bone mass and concurrent deterioration of bone structure. Consequently, bones are more fragile, and there is increased risk of fractures. The potential for acquisition of maximum bone mass is influenced by a number of factors. Among those are heredity, sex, nutrition, endocrine factors, mechanical influences and some risk factors. The best documented nutrient for metabolism of bone is calcium." 

The bottom line is that osteoporosis can result from several underlying issues. Osteoporosis is one of diseases which are influenced by nutrition and life style. It is preventable by means of adequate nutrition which includes CALCIUM and VITAMIN D3 and sufficient physical activity.


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