Cox® Technic
a discussion place for spinal pain management with Cox® Technic

Chiropractic and Back Pain

May 9, 2011 11:34 by juliecoxcid

Chiropractic and Back Pain. Chiropractic and Neck Pain. Chiropractic and Spine Pain. The public thinks of chiropractic for back pain by and large.

  • 33% of 27,810 people chose chiropractors as their treating physician for low back pain in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. (NHANE) [in Deyo R: Spine 12(3)]
  • Spine care delivery is 60% by the medical model and 40% by the chiropractic model. [Saal, Spine 22(14)]
  • The total number of US adults who went to a chiropractor increased 57% from 2000-2003. [Davis, Health Svcs Research 45(3)]
  • Paid costs for back pain care started with a chiropractor were 40% less than care started with a MD. [Liliedahl, JMPT 33(9)]

Chiropractic is reknown for its back pain care. Chiropractic has evidence-based technique to relieve and control back pain like Cox Technic.

The federally funded studies document Cox Technic Flexion-Distraction and Decompression's biomechanical effects on the spine as well as its clinical outcomes:

  • intradiscal pressure drops to as low as -192mm Hg in the lumbar spine
  • 28% widening of the area of the intervertebral canal
  • flexion distraction is superior in relieving pain due to radiculopathy (leg pain) compared to medical care. (Gudavalli, Euro Sp J 2006
  • 29 days and  12 visits are the averages for relief of low back pain when not taking into account specific conditions of back pain. [Cox, Topics in Clinical Chiropractic 1996, 3(3)]
  • 13.2 treatments is the average for relief of neck pain radiculopathy. [Schliesser, Kruse, JMPT 26(9)]

Back pain and chiropractic fit together. The chiropractic physician is skilled in the diagnosis, examination and treatment of back pain as well as its prevention with nutrition, exercise and lifestyle choices. The chiropractic back pain research continues to evolve in support. Chiropractic physicians train specially to keep abreast of the latest research and Cox Technic treatment application in seminars. Back pain patients find Cox Technic physicians for their back pain relief when they search the referral directory of certified Cox Technic physicians.

Research leads the way in evidence-based care and in Cox Technic.

Contact Cox Technic if you have any questions.


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Course to Recertify in Cox Technic Worthwhile

April 5, 2011 09:39 by juliecoxcid

Once every two years, certified chiropractic physicians in Cox Technic are asked to re-certify to remain listed as active in the referral directory. Attending a course or writing a case report for publication is all that is required.

A recent attendee to the Part I Orlando Cox Seminar for re-certification said this:

I am a Cox® certified doctor who has had the new [Cox7] table for over 4 years. I was amazed at how much I learned on improving my technique. If you have not returned to Cox Seminars in a while, you will be impressed by how much you will learn in areas you thought you had mastered. As you all know Dr Jim doesn't not sit still, and the research is constantly getting better.

Cox Technic strives to keep on top of the most recently published medical research as well as keep in tune with the on-going federally funded and other funded research in chiropractic. In just the past 6 weeks, new information from the laboratory has been shared in the lectures. So exciting!

Consider a Cox Technic course soon. The calendar offers courses Part I, II and III around the country: Boston, St. Louis, San Diego, Nashville, Chicago and more.

  • Part I - introductory, non-disc related conditions, biomechanics, examination, diagnosis, step-by-step instructor-guided hands-on application
  • Part II - continuation of Part I principles with more emphasis on the disc-related conditions, Dr. Gudavalli presents the latest in Cox Technic (flexion-distraction) resesarch and allows time for each participant to use the pressure transducer to measure his or her application of proper pressures
  • Part III - Open to anyone to attend, Part III features Cox Technic in the clinic, in the research realm, in the healthcare community. Dr. Cox and Dr. Gudavalli present the latest information and research. Clinical case reports are presented by Dr. Cox as well as certified doctors. Unique practice situations are discussed (interdisciplinary clinics, military integration, hospital integration, etc): how they came about, if the situtations were initiated by the chiropractor or just came about. Interesting and inspiring. 
Each weekend of Cox Seminars offers glimpses into the world of the chiropractic back pain specialist who implements Cox Technic successfully.

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Online Cox® Technic eCourse #1

October 5, 2010 23:09 by juliecoxcid

Well, Dr. Cox and I are venturing into the world of online eCourses. We are not designing these for CE credit, but rather for information and sharing purposes. We can prepare these mini-courses here and you can watch and interact with them wherever you want - home, office, beach.

Course #1 is ready! The first course is on SCOLIOSIS: DEGENERATIVE & IDIOPATHIC. It features clinical patient cases, demonstration of treatment protocols, powerpoint slides of research papers that recently were published discussing scoliosis, its source, treatment and bracing.

It runs about 75 minutes if you take your time in reading the slides and listening to each video segment. I have included links to all the articles Dr. Cox refers in his talk too. You can gather as much information as you want!

We'll work on another one soon. Topic suggestions? We can take those too. Email Julie at info@coxtechnic.com.

Check out our online university at http://coxtechnic.myicourse.com/menu/menu/24537.


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Cox Technic Flexion-Distraction Studied in $2.8 Million Study

June 24, 2010 19:12 by juliecoxcid

June 23, 2010

For release:    Immediately

Contact:          Lori Leipold, Media Relations; Palmer College of Chiropractic; phone (563) 884-5726; fax (563) 884-5225; e-mail lori.leipold@palmer.edu; College website at www.palmer.edu

 

Palmer College of Chiropractic, Loyola University, Hines VA researchers and Dr. James Cox work together to understand Cox® distraction procedure for neck pain

 

In a ground-breaking study, medical and chiropractic researchers are joining efforts to study the effects of a form of non-surgical treatment for neck pain, more specifically Cox distraction manipulation. This study is one of three projects that are part of a four-year, $2.8 million grant awarded in 2008 to the Palmer Center for Chiropractic Research (PCCR), headquartered on the Palmer College of Chiropractic campus in Davenport, Iowa. The grant is from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine to establish a multidisciplinary Developmental Center for Clinical and Translational Science in Chiropractic, and the principal investigator is Christine Goertz, D.C., Ph.D., who also serves as Palmer’s vice chancellor for Research and Health Policy. Co-leaders of the Cox distraction manipulation project are M. Ram Gudavalli, Ph.D., PCCR, and Avinash G. Patwardhan, Ph.D., Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine and Edward Hines Jr. Veterans Affairs Hospital.

This study is in progress and funded through May 30, 2012. It combines the efforts of medical doctors, chiropractors, biomechanists and clinical researchers, in order to document the effects of the Cox distraction chiropractic procedure on neck pain and develop sham and active treatment parameters for conducting clinical studies.

The project, titled Cervical Distraction Sham Development: Translating from Basic to Clinical Studies, consists of three main parts. After completing the pilot studies, the formal basic research study began in March 2010 on the Cox distraction procedure for neck pain at Edward Hines VA Hospital and Loyola University Stritch School of Medicine. This study is a collaborative effort between researchers at these facilities, researchers from Palmer College of Chiropractic, clinicians who perform this technique in their practices, and Dr. James Cox, the originator of the procedure. 

“As the manipulation procedure is performed, we are measuring the variability between four different clinicians trained in this procedure by measuring the loads and the controlled displacements of the table using a basic science approach as well as a clinical approach,” said Dr. Gudavalli from Palmer. “According to practicing doctors of chiropractic, this chiropractic procedure has provided relief for musculoskeletal conditions such as neck pain. However, there is a need for studies that provide information on the biomechanical characterization of such therapies, the biomechanics of normal and pathological joint and muscle systems, and the development of new technologies that study such biomechanics in real time. In other words, what physiological effect does the procedure have that is responsible for its clinical successes?”

The results of this study will aid in the planning and development of controlled procedures in the clinical setting, and test the validity of delivering the controlled procedures by conducting clinical studies and obtaining patients’ perception on the controlled intervention. This knowledge has the potential to guide the future conduct of clinical research in this area and impact training of students and doctors in the chiropractic profession.

- end -

Lori Leipold

Media Relations Manager

Palmer College of Chiropractic

Office: (563) 884-5726

Cell: (563) 343-0665


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Cox® Technic Relieves Radiculopathy Better

May 18, 2010 21:54 by juliecoxcid

Cox® Technic (aka flexion-distraction) clinical outcomes published in European Spine Journal. Flexion-Distraction provided more low back pain relief than did medical conservative active exercise. 

Patients with radiculopathy (leg pain) did significantly better with flexion-distraction than active exercise. 

 

article link: http://www.springerlink.com/content/f32603l877144k77/?p=1ba95a15a905467b8ed4080941ee22e6&pi=4


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Who will do spinal manipulation?

May 4, 2010 14:54 by juliecoxcid

Dr. Cox has been a proponent for years of chiropractic research, research that documents what the chiropractic spinal manipulation does to the spine. He has talked many times about the importance of evidence-based technique. Interestingly, this excerpt from an insurance provider in Indiana ( The Indiana Comprehensive Health Insurance Association, P.O. Box 33009, Indianapolis, IN 46203-0009) which defines, under the section 18 on Therapies, the following:

a)      definition of physical therapy...

b)      definition of speech therapy...

c)      definition of occupational therapy...

d)      Spinal manipulation services to correct, by manual or mechanical means, structural imbalance or subluxation to remove nerve interference from or related to distortion, misalignment or subluxation of or in the vertebral column.

       Note from Dr. Cox is that d) does not define the providers of spinal manipulation. My point in presenting this is that, in the future, the provider of this service, in my opinion and defined by my life stress on chiropractic clinical and biomechanical research studies, will be the profession that has shown evidence-based research to prove its clinical outcome benefits. Thus that will be the profession which is reimbursed.

It's important to support chiropractic research and documentation.


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Cox® Technic Relieves Radiculopathy Sciatica (Leg Pain)

March 19, 2010 10:27 by juliecoxcid
In a randomized, controlled study comparing chiropractic flexion-distraction (Cox® Technic) with medical care (active exercise), flexion-distraction was superior in relieving radiculopathy sciatica (leg pain). Patient were randomized to two groups for care. Those with radiculopathy who were treated with flexion-distraction alone (mind you, no physical modalities or exercise were allowed by the treating chiropractic physicians) had significantly greater relief. The study was published in the European Spine Journal.

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Cox® Technic Seminars Teach Flexion-Distraction Protocols

March 19, 2010 09:47 by juliecoxcid

Cox® Seminars teach the biomechanics, examination, diagnosis and treatment of spinal pain conditions. Treatment is focused on Cox® flexion-distraction and decompression protocols performed by chiropractic physicians who use their hands and their palpatory skills to adjust the spine. Cox® Seminars emphasize the role of the chiropractic physician and his/her trained hands in caring for spinal pain conditions.

60% of chiropractors reported to the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners that they use Cox® Technic.

Chiropractic research projects funded by various organizations from NIH to HRSA to FCER continue to investigate chiropractic flexion distraction. Projects are underway at Palmer Research Center (Gudavalli et al), National University of Health Sciences (Gudavalli & Cambron), New York College of Chiropractic (Dougherty) among others. These projects' goals and outcomes as available are shared.

Cox® Seminars teach the proper application of flexion-distraction protocols. Attending doctors are often taken aback at the low amount of force and at the depth of flexion that is actually required (only 1 to 2 degrees when the protocol is applied correctly). There is nothing like hands-on experience training to really grasp what a technique is all about.

For more information on Cox® Seminars, please click here.

 


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Research Pearls Add Excitement to Practice

February 24, 2010 04:58 by juliecoxcid

Dr. Cox loves spinal literature research. Anyone who has read his books or attended his lectures knows this. He quotes paragraphs off pages from journals some have never heard of! He loves spine research.

He's not alone. Doctors and researchers around the world publish their clinical and experimental findings. Organizations like ISI and others help research lovers gather the pertinent publishings (out of the 25,000 a week that are published!) for their perusal. Dr. Cox uses ISI's key word service to gather related articles from 36 key words (disc, chiropractic, sciatica, whiplash, etc).

Dr. Cox devotes 15 to 20 hours a week reading all these articles then summarizes and organizes them into categories:

  1. Biomechanics
  2. Causes
  3. Cervical
  4. Disc
  5. Incidence
  6. Scoliosis
  7. spondylolisthesis
  8. Treatment

 

For each article, Dr. Cox writes a short, succinct, summarizing title. The title often tells the story. But, for those who want to read more, he gives a more detailed summary, too. If you want to read the full article, you can get it from the source as he gives you the full reference.

Dr. Cox can be your researcher by subscription. He shares his past month's collection of spinal literature via the COX® RESEARCH PEARLS. These come via an email link. With the Cox® Research Pearls, the chiropractic physician is kept abreast of the latest in spinal research literature.


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